Category Archives: production

TouchDesigner | Reusable Code Segmentation with Python

reusable-code-segmentation.PNG

Thinking about how to approach re-usability isn’t a new topic here, in fact there’s been plenty of discussion about how to re-use components saved as tox files, how to build out modular pieces, and how to think about using Extensions for building components you want to re-use with special functions.

That’s wonderful and exciting, but for any of us that have built deployed projects have quickly started to think about how to build a standard project that any given installation is just a variation of… a flavor, if you will, of a standard project build. Much of that customization can be handled by a proper configuration process, but there are some outliers in every project… that special method that breaks our beautiful project paradigm with some feature that’s only useful for a single client or application.

What if we could separate our functions into multiple classes – those that are universal to every project we build, and another that’s specific to just the single job we’re working on? Could that help us find a way to preserve a canonical framework with beautiful abstractions while also making space for developing the one-off solutions? What if we needed a solution to handle the above in conjunction with sending messages over a network?  Finally, what if we paired this with some thoughts about how we handle switch-case statements in Python? Could we find a way to help solve this problem more elegantly so we could work smarter, not harder?

Well, that’s exactly what we’re going to take a look at here.

First a little disclaimer, this approach might not be right for everyone, and there’s a strong assumption here that you’ve got some solid Python under your belt before you tackle this process / working style. If you need to tool up a little bit before you dig in, that’s okay. Take a look at the Python posts to help get situated then come back to really dig in.


Getting Set-up

In order to see this approach really sing we need to do a few things to get set-up. We’ll need a few operators in place to see how this works, so before we dig into the python let’s get our network in order.

First let’s create a new base:

base.PNG

Next, inside of our new base let’s set up a typical AB Deck of TOPs with a constant CHOP to swap between them:

typical-ab-deck.PNG

Above we have two moviefilein TOPS connected to a switch TOP that’s terminated in a null TOP. We also have a constant CHOP terminated in a null whose chan1 value is exported to the index parameter of our switch TOP.

Let’s also use the new Layout TOP in another TOP chain:

layout-top.PNG

Here we have a single layout TOP that’s set-up with an export table. If you’ve never used DAT Exports before you might quickly check out the article on the wiki to see how that works. The dime tour of that ideal is that we use a table DAT to export vals to another operator. This is a powerful approach for setting parameters, and certainly worth knowing more about / exploring.

Whew. Okay, now it’s time to set up our extensions. Let’s start by creating a textDAT called messageParserEXT, generalEXT, and one called jobEXT.

parser-general-job.PNG


The Message Parser

A quick note about our parser. The idea here is that a control machine is going to pass along a message to a set of other machines also running on the network. We’re omitting the process of sending and receiving a JSON blob over UPD, but that would be the idea. The control machine passes a JSON message over the network to render nodes who in turn need to decode the message and perform some action. We want a generalized approach to sending those blobs, and we want both the values and the control messages to be embedded in that JSON blob. In our very simple example our JSON blob has only two keys, messagekind and vals:

message = {
        'messagekind' : 'some_method_name',
        'vals' : 'some_value'
}

In this example, I want the messagekind key to be the same as a method name in our General or Specific classes.

Pero, like why?!

Before we get too far ahead of ourselves, let’s first copy and past the code below into our messageParserEXT text DAT, add our General and Specific Classes, and finish setting up our Extensions.

The General Code Bits

In our generalEXT we’re going to create a General class. This works hand in hand with our parser. The parser is going to be our helper class to handle how we pass around commands. The General class is going to handle anything that we need to have persist between projects. The examples here are not representative of the kind of code you’d have your project, instead they’re just here to help us see what’s happening in this approach.

The Specific Code Bits

Here in our Specific class we have the operations that are specific to this single job – or maybe they’re experimental features that we’re not ready to roll into our General class just yet, regardless, these are methods that don’t yet have a place in our canonical code base. For now let’s copy this code block into our jobEXT text DAT.

At this point we’re just about ready to pull apart what on earth is happening. First let’s make sure our extension is correctly set-up. Let’s go back up a level and configure our base component to have the correct path to our newly created extension:

 

reusable-ext-settings.PNG

Wait wait wait… that’s only one extension? What gives? Part of what we’re seeing here is inheritance. Our Specific class inherits from our General class, which inherits form our MessageParser. If you’re scratching your head, consider that a null TOP is also a TOP is also an OP. In the same way we’re taking advantage of Python’s Object oriented nature so we can treat a Specific class as a special kind of General operation that’s related to sending messages between our objects. All of his leads me to believe that we should really talk about object oriented programming… but that’s for another post.

Alright… ALMOST THERE! Finally, let’s head back inside of our base and create three buttons. Lets also create a panel execute for each button:

buttons.PNG

Our first panel execute DAT needs to be set up to watch the state panel value, and to run on Value Change:

change-switch.PNG

Inside of our panel execute DAT our code looks like:

# me - this DAT
# panelValue - the PanelValue object that changed# # Make sure the corresponding toggle is enabled in the Panel Execute DAT.
def onOffToOn(panelValue):
    return
def whileOn(panelValue):
    return
def onOnToOff(panelValue):
    return
def whileOff(panelValue):
    return
def onValueChange(panelValue):
    message = {
        'messagekind' : 'Change_switch',
        'vals' : panelValue } 
    parent().Process_message(message)
    return

If we make our button viewer active, and click out button we should see our constant1 CHOP update, and our switch TOP change:

switch-gif.gif

AHHHHHHHHH!

WHAT JUST HAPPENED?!


The Black Magic

The secret here is that our messagekind key in our panel execute DAT matches an existing method name in our General class. Our ProcessMessage() method accepts a dictionary then extracts the key for messagekind. Next it checks to see if that string matches an existing method in either our General or Specific classes. If it matches, it then calls that method, and passes along the same JSON message blob (which happens to contain our vals) to the correct method for execution.

In this example the messagekind key was Change_switch(). The parser recognized that Change_switch was a valid method for our parent() object, and then called that method and passed along the message JSON blob. If we take a look at the Change_switch() method we can see that it extracts the vals key from the JSON blob, then changes the constant CHOP’s value0 parameter to match the incoming val.

This kind of approach let’s you separate out your experimental or job specific methods from your tried and true methods making it easier in the long run to move from job to job without having to crawl through your extensions to see what can be tossed or what needs to be kept. What’s better still is that this imposes minimal restrictions on how we work – I don’t need to call a separate extension, or create complex branching if-else trees to get the results I want – you’ll also see that in the MessageParser we have a system for managing elegant failure with our simple if hasattr() check – this step ensure that we log that something went wrong, but don’t just throw an error. You’d probably want to also print the key for the method that wasn’t successfully called, but that’s up to you in terms of how you want to approach this challenge.

Next see if you can successfully format a message to call the Image_order() method with another panel execute.

What happens if you call a method that doesn’t exist? Don’t forget to check your text port for this one.

If you’re really getting stuck you might check the link to the repo below so you can see exactly how I’ve set this process up.

If you got this far, here are some other questions to ponder:

  • How would you  use this in production?
  • What problems does this solve for you… does it solve any problems?
  • Are there other places you could apply this same idea in your projects?

At the end of the day this kind of methodology is really looking to help us stop writing the same code bits and bobs, and instead to figure out how to build soft modules for our code so we can work smarter not harder.

With any luck this helps you do just that.

Happy Programming.


Take a look at the sample Repo for this example on Github:
touchdesigner-reusable-code-segmentation-python

THP 494 & 598 | Touch OSC – A Case Study | TouchDesigner

Core Concepts

  • Hexler’s Touch OSC
  • Simple Network Communication with Open Sound Control
  • Sending Floats from TouchOSC to TouchDesigner
  • Sending Floats from TouchDesigner to TouchOSC
  • Sending Messages from TouchDesiger to TouchOSC

TouchDesigner | Evaluate DAT Magic

13185491723_10766c1574_oLet’s say you’re an ambitions person, maybe too ambitious, and all of a sudden you have a control panel with 68 buttons that need to trigger various scenes, effects, and transitions. Let’s also say that your TouchDesigner network is  vast enough that you need (and I mean in a big way) a simple method for getting information about what’s active in your network. If you find yourself programming the media for a live theatrical event with these same kinds of concerns, the Evaluate DAT might just be the best friend that you didn’t know that you needed.

My example above might sound a little far fetched, so let’s instead look at a more concrete example. Let’s imagine that we have a digital puppet that we’d like to trigger to enter and exit with a button set to toggle. Just to make this more interesting, let’s say that you actually have three puppets and three visual effects that you’d like to all control with buttons from a single control panel. If all of your puppets and effects are all located in a similar place this might not be a huge hassle for you, if however, you’re building a complicated network it will soon become very important to be able to call the states of these buttons across your network.

Here’s my example set-up for us – a control panel that has all of our controls, a base component where we’re going to store the status of our buttons, and a scene where our puppet needs to make an entrance and an exit based on our button’s active state.

Screenshot_031614_012640_AM

I’m going to assume that you’re already familiar with working with control panels in TouchDesigner, but if that’s not the case you can learn a little more here before you keep reading. Lets start by taking a look inside of our “trigger_ref” base component where we are going to store the status of our buttons to use other places in our network.

Screenshot_031614_013152_AM

This should look pretty impressively boring at first glance. To really get a feel for what’s happening here, let’s take a closer took how how this is being driven by our control panel.

evaluate DAT in action

Alright, so here we can see that Puppet 1, 2, and 3 all act as Toggle switches, VFX 1 acts as a momentary trigger, and VFX2 and VFX3 both act as toggles. Before we start to look at why this is important, let’s first see how this is working.

To really make our Evaluate DAT sing we need to start by feeding a table with some instructions about what information we would like it to evaluate. In my case I’ve made a table with a name for the item that I’d like to call in one column, and the pathway to the operator and channel that’s being evaluated in the other column.

Screenshot_031614_013937_AM

If we were to write these instructions in English they might read something like: “TouchDesigner, please watch operator ‘button0’ in ‘ctrl’ and tell me when it’s v1 changes, and give that the name ‘Puppet1’. It’s important note that the formatting and syntax of your request to the Evaluate DAT matters. In my case I needed to put the names in the first column in quotations. I also made sure to tell the evaluate DAT that I wanted an integer (you’ll notice that in front of the operator’s pathway I’ve int() to specify that I want an integer returned to me). Next in the Evaluate DAT I need to check a few settings in the operators parameters.

Screenshot_031614_014828_AM

The most important parameter to take note of here is that I’ve told the Evaluate DAT that I’d like the output in Expressions. This ensures that my input table is being evaluated.

Okay, but why is this interesting / important / worth your attention? While it might be tempting to avoid an organization method like this, it means that when you’re working with a large control panel, or a large cue stack, that you can refer to a button by its name rather than by a complicated network pathway. Better yet, once you write the expression to call this value from our Evaluate DAT it becomes easy to copy and paste that expression and only need to change the name of the value that you’re calling. Let’s go back to our puppet example.

Screenshot_031614_020356_AMHere I have my video that I’d like to change with my puppet button. I’ve already set up my network with a few operators. First I have a constant CHOP, and a trigger CHOP. Next I have a Movie in TOP, a Level TOP, and a Null TOP. I’d like to use my trigger CHOP to change the opacity of my Movie.

To start let’s make sure that our constant CHOP is set up with a channel that we’ll name “Puppet1” .

Screenshot_031614_021044_AM

Let’s also make sure that our trigger is set to have a sustain value of 1, and let’s make sure that we’re happy with how the trigger is going to fire and release. For now I’m only interested in making sure that my sustain is changed.

Screenshot_031614_020704_AM Next we’re going to write a quick expression that will allow our level TOP to reference the trigger CHOP. In your level top we’re going to use the expression on the opacity Parameter on the Post page of Level TOP:

op( “trigger1” )[ “Puppet1” ]

Screenshot_031614_021154_AM

Now we’re going to go back to our constant CHOP to see how this really makes our network programming fun. Here for the value of the Puppet1 channel we’re going to write the following expression:

op( “../trigger_ref/buttons” ) [ “Puppet1” , 1 ]

Screenshot_031614_021552_AM

Now, let’s finally see what this means when we use this in conjunction with our control panel.

puppet inout

Great, so now we toggle the opacity of a video on and off with a button. What’s important here is that what if you suddenly decide that you want this action to happen with the Puppet 2 button instead? Now, rather than having to look up where your original button was, along with it’s reference you can instead just change the expression in the Constant CHOP to be:

op( “../trigger_ref/buttons” ) [ “Puppet2” , 1 ]

Right? We’ve changed all of those button values into a table that we can centrally reference by name. If you’re just getting started with TouchDesigner this might not seem like a huge revelation, but once you start to build more complicated networks the ability to call something by a name (maybe even a name that’s in your cue sheet) becomes hugely important.

TouchDesigner | Replicators, and Buttons, and Tables, oh my

replicator cue buttons

I want 30 buttons. Who doesn’t want 30 buttons in their life? Control panels are useful for all sorts of operations in TouchDesigner, but they can also be daunting if you’re not accustomed to how they work. In the past when I’ve wanted lots of buttons and sliders I’ve done all of my lay-out work the hard way… like the hardest way possible, one button or slider at a time. This is great practice, and for anyone who is compulsively organized this activity can be both maddening and deeply satisfying at the same time. If you feel best when you’re meticulously aligning your buttons and sliders in perfect harmony, this might be the read for you. If, however, you like buttons (lots of them), and you want to be able to use one of the most powerful components in TouchDesigner, then Replicators might just be the tool you’ve been looking for – even if you didn’t know it.

Replicators, big surprise, make copies of things. On the surface of it, this might not seem like the most thrilling of operators, but lets say that you want to automate a process that might be tedious if you set out to do it by hand. For example, let’s say you’re designing a tool or console that needs 30 buttons of the same type, but you’d like them have unique names and follow a template and have unique names. You could do this one button at a time, but if you ever change something inside of the button (like maybe you want the colors to change depending on their select state), making that change to each button might be a huge hassle. Replicators can help us make that process fast, easy, just plain awesome.

First thing, let’s make a container and dive inside of it to start making our buttons. Next let’s make a table. I’m going to use my table DAT to tell the replicator how to make the copies of my button. As you start to think about making a table imagine that each row (or column) is going to be used to create our copies. For example, I’ve created a table with thirty rows, Cue 1 – Cue 30.

Screenshot_030614_011703_AM

Next let’s make a button COMP and rename it button0 (don’t worry, this will make sense in a a few minutes).

Screenshot_030614_012057_AM

Alright, now we’re gonna do some detailed work to set-up our button so some magic will happen later. First up we’re going to make a small change to the Align Order of our button. The Align Order parameter of a button establishes the order in which your buttons are arranged in the control panel when you use the Align Parameter (if this doesn’t make sense right now, hang in there and it will soon). We’re going to use a simple python expression to specify this parameter. Expand the field for the Align Order and type the python expression:

me.digits

What’s this all about? This expression is calling for the number that’s in the name of our button. Remember that we renamed our button to button0. Using this expression we’ve told TouchDesigner that the alignment order parameter of this button should be 0 (in many programming languages you start counting at 0, so this makes this button the first in a list).

Screenshot_030614_012854_AM

Alright, now let’s start making some magic happen. Let’s go inside of our button and make a few changes to the background text. If this is your first time looking inside of the button component take a moment to get your bearings – we have a table DAT that’s changing the color of the button based on how we interact with this component, we have some text that we’re using for the background of the button, and we have a few CHOPs so we can see what the state of our button is when it’s toggled or pressed.

Screenshot_030614_013526_AM

Next we’re going to take a closer look at just the text TOP called bg. Looking first at the text page of the parameters dialogue gives us a sense of what’s happening here, specifically we can see that the text field is where we can change what’s displayed on this button. First up we’re going to tell this TOP that we want to pull some data from a DAT. In the DAT field type the path:

../table1

Next change the DAT Row to the following python expression:

me.parent().digits

Finally, clear the text parameter so it’s blank. With any luck you’re button should now read, “Cue 1,” or whatever you happened to type in the first row of your table.

Screenshot_030614_014601_AM

So what’s happening here?! First, we’re telling this TOP that we’re going to use some information from a table. Specifically, we’re going to use a table whose name is table1, and it’s location is in the parent network (that’s what ../ means). If we were to take our network path ../table1 and write it as a sentence it might read something like this – “hey TouchDesigner I want you to use a table DAT for this TOP, to find it look in the network above me for something named table1.” Next we have an expression that’s telling this TOP what row to pull text from. We just used a similar expression when we were setting our alignment order, and the same idea applies here – me.parent().digits as a sentence might read “hey TouchDesigner, look at my parent (the component that I’m inside of) and find the number at the end of its name.” Remember that we named this component button0, and that 0 (the digits from that name) correspond to the first row in our table.

Now it’s time to blow things up. Let’s add a replicator component to our network.

Screenshot_030614_015654_AM

In the parameters for our replicator first specify that table1 is the template table. Next let’s change the Operator Prefix to button to match the convention that we already started. Last by not least set your Master Operator to be your button0.

Screenshot_030614_020047_AM

If we set up everything correctly we should now have a total of 30 buttons arranged in a grid in our network. They should also each have a unique name that corresponds to the table that we used to make this array.

Screenshot_030614_020310_AM

Last but not least, let’s back up and see what this looks like from the container view. At this point you should be sorely disappointed, because our control panel looks all wrong – in fact it looks like there’s only one button. What gives?

Screenshot_030614_020604_AM

The catch here is that we still need to do a little bit of house keeping to get to what we’re after. In the Container’s parameters on the layout page make sure the Align parameter is set to “Layout Grid Columns” or “Layout Grid Rows” depending on what view better suits your needs. You might also want to play with the Align Margin if you’d like your buttons to have a little breathing room.

Screenshot_030614_020954_AM

Bingo-Bango you’ve just made some replicator mojo happen. With your new grid of buttons you’re ready to do all sorts of fun things. Remember that each of these buttons is based on the template of the master operator that we specified in the replicator. In our case that’s button0. This means that if you change that operator – maybe you change the color, or add an expression inside of the button – when you click the “recreate all operators” in the replicator, this remakes your buttons with those changes applied to every button.

Happy replicating.


A big thank you to Richard Burns and Space Monkeys for sharing this brief tutorial that inspired me to do some more looking and playing with Replicators:

TouchDesigner | 3D solutions for a 2D world

12761364894_714f3b8985_nOne of the fascinating pieces of working in TouchDesigner is the ability to use 3D tools to solve 2D problems. For the last seven months or so I’ve been working on Daniel Fine’s thesis project – Wonder Dome. Dome projection is a wild ride, and one of the many challenges we’ve encountered is thinking about how to place media on the dome without the time intensive process of pre-rendering all of the content specifically for this projection environment. To address some of these issues we started working with Los Angles based Vortex Immersion Media, their lead programmer is the TouchDesigner specialist Jeff Smith of Eve Vapor. Part of the wonderful opportunity we’ve had in working with Vortex is getting to take an early look at Jeff’s custom built Dome Mapping tool. Built exclusively in TouchDesigner it’s an incredibly powerful piece of software built to make the dome warping and blending process straightforward. The next step in the process for us was to consider how we were going to place content on the interior surface of the dome. The dome mapping tool that we’re using uses a square raster as an input, and can be visualized by looking at a polar array. If you’re at all interested in dome projection, start by looking at Paul Bourke’s site – the wealth of information here has proven to be invaluable to the Wonder Dome team as we’ve wrestled with dome projection challenges. This square image is beautiful mapped to the interior surface of the dome, making placing content a matter of considering where on the array you might want a piece of artwork to live.

There are a number of methods for addressing this challenge, and my instinct was to build a simple TouchDesigner network that would allow us to see, place, and manipulate media in real time while we were making the show. Here’s what my simple asset placement component looks like:

asset placement

This component based approach makes it easy for the design and production team to see what something looks like in the dome in real time, and to place it quickly and easily. Additionally this component is built so that adding in animation for still assets is simple and straight forward.

Let’s start by taking a look at the network that drives this object, and cover the conceptual structure behind its operation.

Screenshot_022814_125736_AM

In this network we have a series of sliders that are controlling some key aspects of the media – orientation along a circular path, distance from the center, and zoom. These sliders also pass out values to a display component to make it easy to take note of the values needed for programming animation.

We also have a render chain that’s doing a few interesting things. First we’re taking a piece of source media, and using that to texture a piece of geometry with the same aspect ratio as our source. Next we’re placing that rectangle in 3D space and locking its movement to a predefined circular pathway. Finally we’re rendering this from the perspective of a camera looking down on the object as though it were on a table.

Here I’m using a circle SOP to create a circle that will be the pathway that my Geo COMP will rotate around. Here I ended this network in a null so that if we needed to make any changes I wouldn’t have to change the export settings for this pathway.

Screenshot_022714_095918_AM

You’ll also notice that we’re looking at the parameters for the circle where I’ve turned on the bulls-eye so we’re only seeing the parameters that I’ve changed. I’ve made this a small NURBS curve to give me a simple circle.

The next thing I want to think about is setting up a surface to be manipulated in 3D space. This could be a rectangle or a grid. I’m using a rectangle in this particular case, as I don’t need any fancy deformation to be applied to this object. In order to see anything made in 3D space we need to render those objects. The render process looks like a simple chain of component operators: a geo COMP, a camera COMP, a light COMP, and a render TOP. In order to render something in 3D space we need a camera (a perspective that we’re viewing the object from), a piece of geometry (something to render), and a light (something to illuminate the object).

Screenshot_022814_125903_AM

We can see in my network below that I’ve used an in TOP so that I can feed this container from the parent portion of the network. I’ve also given this a default image so that I can always see something in my container. You might also notice that while I have a camera and a geo, I don’t have a light COMP. This is because I’m using a material type that doesn’t require any lighting. More about that in a moment. We can also see that my circle is being referenced by the Geo, and that the in TOP is also being referenced by the Geo. To better understand what’s happening here we need to dive into the Geo COMP.

Screenshot_022814_125926_AM

Inside of the Geo COMP we can see a few interesting things at work. One thing you’ll notice is that I have a constant MAT and an info CHOP inside of this object. Both of these operators are referencing the in TOP in that’s in the parent network. My constant is referencing the in to establish what is going to be applied to the Geo as a material. My info CHOP gives me quick access to several of the attributes of my source file. Included in this list of attributes is the resolution of the source media. I can use this information to determine the aspect ratio of the source, and then make sure that my rectangle is sized to match. Using this process I don’t have to rely on a particular aspect ratio for my source material, I can pass this container any shape of rectangular image, and it will size itself appropriately.

Initially I just had three sliders that controlled the placement of my media in this environment. Then I started thinking about what I would really need during our technical rehearsals. It occurred to me that I would want the option to be able to place the media on the surface of the dome from a position other than behind the media server. To address this need I built a simple TouchOSC interface to replicate my three sliders. Next I captured that OSC information with TouchDesigner, and then passed that stream of floats into my container. From here I suddenly had to do some serious thinking about what I wanted this object to do. Ideally, I wanted to be able to control the container either form the media server, or from a remote access panel (TouchOSC). I also wanted the ability to record the position information that was being passed so I could use it later. This meant that I needed to think about how I was going to capture and recall the same information from three possible sources. To do this I first started by packaging my data with merge CHOPs. I also took this opportunity to rename my channels. For example, my OSC data read – osc_rot, osc_dist, osc_zoom; rotation, distance, and zoom sliders from my TouchOSC panel. I repeated this process for the sliders, and for the table that I was using. I also knew that I wanted to rename my stream, and pass it all to a null CHOP before exporting it across the network. To keep my network a little more tidy I used a base to encapsulate all of the patching and selecting, and switching that needed to happen for this algorithm to work properly.

Screenshot_022814_010413_AM

Inside of the base COMP we can see that I’m taking my three in CHOPs selecting for the appropriate channel, passing this to a switch (so I can control what value is driving the rendering portion of my network) and then back out again. You may also notice that I’m passing the switch values to a null, and then exporting that do a opViewer TOP. The opViewer TOP creates a rendered image of the channel operator at work. Why would I do this? Well, I wanted a confidence monitor for my patch-bay. The base COMP allows you to assign a TOP to its display. Doing this meant that I could see into a portion of the base, without having to actually be inside of this component.

Screenshot_022814_010506_AM

With all of the patching setup, I needed to build an interface that would control all of these changes. I also needed a way to capture the values coming out of TouchOSC, store them in a table, and then recall them later.

Screenshot_022814_010616_AM

The solution here was to build a few buttons to drive this interface. To drive the witch CHOP in my base component, I used three buttons encapsulated inside of a container COMP and set to operate as radio buttons. I then used a panel CHOP in the container to export which button was currently being toggled into the on position. Next I added a button COMP to record the values set from TouchOSC. Using a Chop to DAT I was able to capture the float values streaming into my network, and I knew that what I wanted was to be able to copy a set of these values to a table. To do this I used a panel execute DAT. This class of DAT looks at the panel properties of a specified container (buttons and sliders also qualify here), and runs a script when the specified conditions in the DAT are met. This is the portion of the network that gave me the most headache. Understanding how these DATs work, and the best method of working with them took some experimentation. To trouble shoot this, I started by writing my script in a text DAT, and then running it manually. Once I had a script that was doing what I wanted, I then set to the task of better understanding the panel execute DAT. For those interested in Python scripting in TouchDesigner, here’s the simple method that I used:

m = op (“chopto1”)
n = op (“table1”)
n.copy(m)

Here the operator chopto1 is the DAT that is capturing the OSC stream. The operator table1 is an empty table that I want to copy values to, it’s the destination for my data. The Python method copy starts by specifying the destination, and then the source that you want to pull from.

Screenshot_022814_010809_AM

Finally ready to work with the panel execute DAT, I discovered that all of my headaches were caused by misplacing the script. To get the DAT to operate properly I just had to make sure that my intended script was between the parameter specified, and the return call.

Screenshot_022814_010926_AM

One last helpful hint / tip that I can offer from working on this component is how to specify the order of your buttons in a container. One handy feature in the container parameters page is your ability to have TouchDesigner automatically array your buttons rather than placing them yourself. The catch, how do you specify the order the buttons should appear in? If you look a the parameter page for the buttons themselves, you’ll notice that they have a smartly named parameter named “Alignment Order.” This, sets their alignment order in the parent control panel.

If I’ve learned nothing else, I have learned that sometimes it’s the simplest things that are the easiest to miss.

Cue Building for Non-Linear Productions

The newly devised piece that I’ve been working on here at ASU finally opened this last weekend. Named “The Fall of the House of Escher” the production explores concepts of quantum physics, choice, fate, and meaning through by combining the works of MC Escher and Edgar Allen Poe. The production has been challenging in many respects, but perhaps one of the most challenging elements that’s largely invisible to the audience is how we technically move through this production.

Early in the process the cohort of actors, designers, and directors settled on adopting a method of story telling that drew its inspiration from the Choose Your Own Adventure books that were originally published in the 1970’s. In these books the reader gets to choose what direction the protagonist takes at pivotal moments in the drama. The devising team was inspired by the idea of audience choice and audience engagement in the process of story telling. Looking for on opportunity to more deeply explore the meaning of audience agency, the group pushed forward in looking to create a work where the audience could choose what pathway to take during the performance. While Escher was not as complex as many of the inspiring materials, its structure presented some impressive design challenges.

Our production works around the idea that there are looping segments of the production. Specifically, we repeat several portions of the production in a Groundhog Day like fashion in order to draw attention to the fact that the cast is trapped in a looped reality. Inside of the looped portion of the production there are three moments when the audience can choose what pathway the protagonist (Lee) takes, with a total of four possible endings before we begin the cycle again. The production is shaped to take the audience through the choice section two times, and on the third time through the house the protagonist chooses a different pathway that takes the viewers to the end of the play. The number of internal choices in the production means that there are a total of twelve possible pathways through the play. Ironically, the production only runs for a total of six shows, meaning that at least half of the pathways through the house will be unseen.

This presents a tremendous challenge to any designers dealing with traditionally linear based story telling technologies – lights, sound, media. Conceiving of a method to navigate through twelve possible production permutations in a manner that any board operator could follow was daunting – to say the least. This was compounded by a heavy media presence in the production (70 cued moments), and the fact that the scrip was continually in development up until a week before the technical rehearsal process began. This meant that while much of the play had a rough shape, there were changes which influenced the technical portion of the show being made nearly right up until the tech process began. The consequences of this approach were manifest in three nearly sleepless weeks between the crystallization of the script and opening night – while much of the production was largely conceived and programmed, making it all work was its own hurdle.

In wrestling with how to approach this non-linear method, I spent a large amount of time trying to determine how to efficiently build a cohesive system that allowed the story to jump forwards, backwards, and sidewise in a system of interactive inputs, and pre-built content. The approach that I finally settled on was thinking of the house as a space to navigate. In other words, media cues needed to live in the respective rooms where they took place. Navigating then was a measure of moving from room to room. This ideological approach was made easier with the addition of a convention for the “choice” moments in the play when the audience chooses what direction to go. Have a space that was outside of the normal set of rooms in the house allowed for an easier visual movement from space to space, while also providing for visual feedback that for the audience to reinforce that they were in fact making a choice.

Establishing a modality for navigation grounded the media design in an approach that made the rest of the programming process easier – in that establishing a set of norms and conditions creates a paradigm that can be examined, played with, even contradicted in a way that gives the presence of the media a more cohesive aesthetic. While thinking of navigation as a room-based activity made some of the process easier, it also introduced an additional set of challenges. Each room needed a base behavior, an at rest behavior that was different from its reactions to various influences during dramatic moments of the play. Each room also had to contain all of the possible variations that existed within that particular place in the house – a room might need to contain three different types of behavior depending on where we were in the story.

I should draw attention again to the fact that this method was adopted, in part, because of the nature of the media in the show. The production team committed early on to looking for interactivity between the actors and the media, meaning that a linear asset based play-back system like Dataton’s Watchout was largely out of the picture. It was for this reason that I settled on using troikatronix Isadora for this particular project. Isadora also offered opportunities for tremendous flexibility, quartz integration, and non-traditional playback methods; methods that would prove to be essential in this process.

Fall_of_the_House_of_Escher_SHOW_DEMO.izzIn building this navigation method it was first important to establish the locations in the house, and create a map of how each module touched the others in order to establish the required connections between locations. This process involved making a number of maps to help translate these movements into locations. While this may seem like a trivial step in the process, it ultimately helped solidify how the production moved, and where we were at any given moment in the various permutations of the traveling cycle. Once I had a solid sense of the process of traveling through the house I built a custom actor in Isadora to allow me to quickly navigate between locations. This custom actor allowed me to build the location actor once, and then deploy it across all scenes. Encapsulation (creating a sub-patch) played a large part in the process of this production, and this is only a small example of this particular technique.

Fall_of_the_House_of_Escher_SHOW_DEMO.izz 2

The real lesson to come out of non-linear story telling was the importance on planning and mapping for the designer. Ultimately, the most important thing for me to know was where we were in the house / play. While this seems like an obvious statement for any designer, this challenge was compounded by the nature of our approach: a single control panel approach would have been too complicated, and likewise a single trigger (space bar, mouse click, or the like) would never have had the flexibility for this kind of a production. In the end each location in the house had its own control panel, and displayed only the cues corresponding to actions in that particular location. For media, conceptualizing the house as a physical space to be navigated through was ultimately the solution to complex questions of how to solve a problem like non-linear story telling.