textport for performance | TouchDesiger

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I love a good challenge, and today on the TouchDesigner slack channel there was an interesting question about how you might go about getting the contents of the textport into a texture to display. That’s a great question, and I can imagine a circumstance where that might be a fun and interesting addition to a set. Sadly, I have no idea about how you might make that happen. I looked through the wiki a bit to see if there were any leads, and it’s difficult to see if there’s actually a good way to grab the contents of the textport.

What do we do then?!

Well, it just so happens that this might be another great place to look at how to take advantage of using extensions in TouchDesigner. Here our extension is going to do some double duty for us. The big picture idea is that we’ll want to be able to use a single call to either display a string, or print and display a string. If you only wanted to print it you could just use print(), so we’ll leave that one out of the mix for now.

Let’s take a look at the extension and then pull apart what’s happening in side.

Okay, so what exactly are we doing here?!

The big picture is that we want a way to be able to log something to a text  object that can be displayed. In this case I choose a table DAT. The reasoning here is that a table DAT before being converted to just a text DAT allows us to do some simple clean up and line adjustments. Each new entry is posted in a row – which makes for an easy way to limit the number of displayed rows. We can do this with a select DAT – which is where we use our StartRow and EndRow members.

Why exactly do we use these? Well, this helps ensure that we can keep our newest row displayed. A text TOP can accept a text DAT of any length, but at some point the text will spill off the bottom – unless you use adaptive sizing. The catch there is that at some point the text will become impossible to read. A top and bottom boundary ensures that we can always have something portion of our text displayed. We use a simple logical test in our Display() method to see if we’ve hit that boundary yet, and if we have we can update our members plus one… moving them both along at the same time.

You may also notice that we have a separate method to display and print… why not just do this in a single method. Well, that’s a great question. We could just use a single method for this with another argument. That’s probably a better way to tackle this challenge, but I wanted to use this opportunity to show how we might call another method from within our class. This can be helpful in a number of different situations, and while this application is a little too simple to really take advantage of that technique, it gives you a peak into how it might work.

Want to download the tox and take it for a test drive? You can find the source code here.