OSC Remote Control | TouchDesigner

13771584713_fb81838217_mThere’s a lot to love about the internet, really. But I think one of my favorite things is how it connects people, how it flattens old hierarchies (not really, but let me wax idealistic for the sake of this intro) and connects people. In starting to program with TouchDesigner, I did the thing that any smart n00b would do – I joined the forum. The TouchDesigner forum is a great place to ask questions, find answers, learn from some of the best, and to offer help. We’ve all been stuck on a problem, and a commons like this one is a great place to ask questions, and keep tabs on what others are doing. To that end I shared a technique for sending and receiving OSC data with TouchDesigner back in October of 2013. I also shared this on the forum, because this happened to be something that I figured that others might want to know more about. My post was a simple example, but often it’s the simple examples that help move towards complex projects. As it turns out, someone else was fighting the same battle, and had some questions about how to make some headway – specifically they wanted to look at how to create an interface that could be controlled remotely with TouchOSC or from the TouchDesigner control panel itself. Ideally, each interface’s changes would be reflected in the other – changes on a smartphone would show up in the TouchDesigner control panel, and vice versa. I caught the first part of the exchange, and then I got swallowed by the theatre. First there was The Fall of the Hose of Escher, then Before You Ruin It took over my life, and then I spent almost a month solid in Wonder Dome. Long story short, I missed responding to a question, and finally made up for my bad Karma by responding, even if belatedly. It then occurred to me that I might as well write down the process of solving this problem. If you want to see the whole exchange you can read the thread here.

Enough jibber-jabber, let’s start programming.

For the sake of our sanity, I’m going to focus on just working with two sliders and two toggle buttons. The concepts we’ll cover here can then be applied to any other kind of TouchOSC widget, but let’s start small first. One more disclaimer, this one creates a messy network. If we took a little more time we could clean it up, but for now we’re going to let it be a little bit sloppy  – as much as it pains me to do so.

First things first, if you’re new to using TouchOSC you should take some time to get used to the basics and start by reading through this overview on using TouchOSC. Open Sound Control (OSC) messages are messages that are sent over a network. OSC can be used locally on a computer to allow for communication between programs, and it can also be used between multiple machines in order to allow them to communicate with one another. Interface tools like TouchOSC allow users to create custom interfaces that control some aspect of a program. That’s a very simplistic way of looking at OSC, but it’s a good start. The important takeaway here is that when we use OSC we’re actually relying on some network protocols to facilitate the communication between computers.

To get started I selected a simple interface on an iPod Touch that came with TouchOSC. Again, I wanted something with two toggles and two sliders to serve as our example. We can set-up our mobile device by starting TouchOSC and hitting the circular option / configuration button in the corner.

Once we do that we’ll see a screen with a few different options. We want to select the OSC connection tab.

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From here we need to configure a few settings. First off you’ll want to set add the IP address of your computer into the “Host” field. To find your computer’s IP address you can use the ipconfig command to quickly find your IP address (if this sounds like another language, check out this youTube video to see what I’m talking about). I also want to take note of the IP address of the device – this is the “Local IP address.” I also want to take a close look at the outgoing and incoming ports, I’ll need to use these numbers in TouchDesigner to make sure that I can talk and listen to this device.

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Alright, now that we know a few things about our mobile device now we can head back to TouchDesigner.

First off, let’s take a look at how to listen to the incoming data. In a new network at an OSC In CHOP.

OSC_In

In the parameters box let’s make sure that we’re listening to the same port that we’re broadcasting on – in my case it’s port 10000. Now you should be able to start hitting buttons and moving sliders to see some new channels appear in your CHOP. Here’s it’s important to take a closer look at the naming convention for our channels. Let’s look at 1/fader1 first. TouchOSC has a great utility for creating your layouts, and if you let it do the naming for you this is the kind of format that you’ll see. The semantics of this are page/widgetNameWidgetNumber. So by looking at 1/fader1 we can read this to mean that this is on page one, it’s a fader, and it’s number (the order it was created) is one. This naming convention is going to be important to take note of, and will save you a lot of headaches if you take some time to really wrap your head around how these widgets are named.

Before we start building an interface to control let’s take a moment to get a few more ducks in a row. I’m going to connect my OSC In CHOP to four different select CHOPS – each control is going to be routed to a button or slider, and I want to make sure that I’m only dealing with one channel to do this.

4selectsFor my own sanity I’ve named each of the selects with a name that corresponds to what channel they’re carrying. You can choose any naming convention that you’d like, but definitely choose a naming convention. This kind of patching can get messy quickly, and a solid method for naming your operators will server you well.

Before we move on let’s take a closer look at one of the selects to see how we can pull out a particular channel.

fader1

You’ll notice that in the Channel Names I’ve used the name *fader1 rather than 1/fader1. What gives?! Either of those names is going to give me the same result in this case. I’ve elected to use the asterisk modifier to save myself some time and because I’m only using page one of this particular interface. What does the asterisk modifier do? I’m so glad you asked – this particular modifier will give results that match anything after the asterisk. If, for example, I had 1/fader1, 2/fader1, and 3/toggle1 as incoming channels, the asterisk would pull out the 1/fader1 and 2/fader1 channels. Naming and patterning isn’t important for this particular example, but it’s a technique to keep your back pocket for a rainy day.

Okay, now that we’ve got our OSC In data ready, let’s build a quick interface. In this instance I’m going to use two vertical sliders from the TUIK presets in the pallet browser. You can find them here:

TUIK

I’m also going to add two Button COMPs  and a Container COMP to my network.

interfaceSetup

Before we move forward, I need to make a few quick changes to by buttons. You’ll notice that the sliders both have CHOP inlets on their left-hand side, but my buttons do not. This means that my sliders are all ready set-up to receive a channel stream to change them. My buttons aren’t ready yet, so let’s take a look at the changes we need to make. Let’s start by diving into our button.

buttonCOMP

If this is your first time taking a look inside of button comp take a moment to read through a quick overview about working with buttons in TouchDesigner. We’re going to want to add a CHOP In to this component, and we’re going to also want the changes from the Touch interface to drive how our button’s color changes. Here’s what that’s going to look like:

new buttonHere I’ve added an In CHOP that feeds to a Math CHOP that I’ve renamed to “i” that’s finally connected to our Out CHOP. So why a Math, and why rename it? If you look closely at the Text TOP  you’ll see that it’s driven by several expressions allowing it to change color based on its active state – this is part of what’s happening in the expression CHOP originally called “i”. Here our Math CHOP is set to add our in and the “ii” CHOP (formerly just “i”) together. By changing the name of the operators, I’ve avoided re-writing the scripts to save myself some time.

With our buttons and sliders finally ready we can start connecting our interface elements. There are lots of ways to build interface elements in TouchDesigner, but today I’m just going to use the ability to wire components vertically to do this. First I’m going to layout my buttons and sliders in an approximate location that matches my TouchOSC layout just to help me get organized initially. Next I’m going to connect them through their vertical inlets to my container COMP. In the end, if you’re following along, it should look something like this:

vierticalwires

Finally, you’ll want to take some time to adjust the placement of your buttons and sliders, as well as adjusting their color or other elements of their appearance. My final set up looks like this:

finalcontrol

If you’re still with me, this is where the real magic starts to happen. First up we’re going to connect the our corresponding OSC In values to our control panel elements that we want to control. Fader 1 to fader 1, toggle 1 to toggle 1 and so on. Next we’re going to connect all four of our control panel elements to a single Merge CHOP.

almsot there

Next we’ll need to do a little renaming. To make things easier I’m going to use a Rename CHOP and a Constant CHOP. Here our Constant CHOP holds all of the names that we want to apply to the channels that are coming into our Rename CHOP. Here’s where all of that funny business about naming our channels becomes important. To make sure that I’m feeding back data to TouchOSC in a way that properly associates changes to my sliders I need to follow the naming conventions exactly the way they’re coming into TouchDesigner. 1/fader1 that’s since become v1 needs to have it’s name changed back to 1/fader1. You can see what I mean by taking a closer look at the network below:

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Last but not least we’re going to connect our rename CHOP to an OSC Out CHOP. When we set out our OSC out we need to know the IP address of the device that we want to communicate with, and we need to know the port that we’re broadcasting to. I also like to change my OSC Out to be samples, and to turn off “Send every cook.” Sending with every cook is going to create a lot more network traffic, and while it’s not an issue for TouchOSC, if you’re working with someone using MaxMSP having this trick up your sleeve is going to make them much happier. Here’s what our OSC Out operator should look like:

OSCOUT

Whew! Alright gang, at this point you should be ready to start making the magic happen. If you’ve got everything set-up correctly you should now be able to drive your control panel in TouchDesigner either from the panel we created, or from a TouchOSC setup. As a bonus (why we did all of this hard work) you should also be able to see your changes in either environment reflected in the other.

simplefeedback