TouchOSC | Serious Show Control

TouchOSC BuffetI know. You love your iDevice / Android. You love your phone, your tablet, your phablet, your you name it. You love them. Better yet, you’ve discovered Hexler’s TouchOSC and the thought of controlling your show / set / performance set you on fire – literally. You were beside yourself with glee and quickly set yourself to the task of triggering things remotely. Let’s be honest, it’s awesome. It’s beyond awesome, in some respects there are few things cooler than being able to build a second interface for a programming environment that works on your favorite touch screen device. But before we get too proud of ourselves, let’s have a moment of honesty. True honesty. You’ve dabbled and scrambled, but have you ever really sat down to fully understand all of the different kinds of buttons and switches in TouchOSC? I mean really looked at them and thought about what they’re good for? I know, because I hadn’t either. But it’s time, and it’s time in a big way.

TouchOSC_Editor_-_Untitled_1_touchoscFirst things first, make sure you download a copy of the TouchOSC editor for your OS of choice. If you happen to be using windows, save yourself a huge hassle and make sure that you download the version of the editor (32 or 64 bit) that corresponds to the version of Java that you’re running – otherwise you’ll find yourself unable to open the editor and be grumpy. Great. Now in the editor create a new control setup. Make sure you’re configured to work on the device that you’re planning on playing with / use the most. In my case I’m working with an iPad layout. I prefer to use my iPad in a horizontal orientation most of the time for show control. I’m also only working with one page for now, and happy to leave it as named “1”. You’ll notice for now that the box next to auto for OSC is checked – we’ll leave that for now. Alright, now we’re going to do something that most of us have never done.

In your empty control panel, right click and add one of every different kind of object. Yep. Add one of each so we can look at how they all work. You might choose to skip the repetition of vertical and horizontal sliders – that’s a-okay, but make sure you pick one of them. By the end you should have something that looks like this:

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That’s certainly not sexy, but it’s going to teach you more than you can imagine. Next upload that interface to your device of choice. If you’ve never uploaded a new interface to TouchOSC you’ll need to know the IP address of your computer. If you’re using a windows machine you can use the command prompt and ipconfig to find this information, on a mac use the network pane in System Preferences. Next you’ll want to transfer this layout to your device, Helxer has a wonderful piece of documentation about do get this done, and you can read it here.

Next take a moment to read through what all of those lovely widgets do and how they talk to your programming environment. After that the real fun starts. Start listening to your network with your programming environment of choice, and look at what kinds of messages you get from all of these different kinds of buttons and sliders.

Isadora

If you’re working with Troikatronix Isadora you can start to see the signal flow coming from your layout by first going to the communications drop down menu, and then selecting “Stream Setup.”

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Next you’ll want to select “auto detect input.”

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Now you can start moving sliders and toggling buttons so you can record their address. Make sure that you select “Renumber Ports” and click “OK” on the bottom of the page.

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Now you’re ready to use the OSC listener actor to use those inputs to drive any number of elements inside of your scene. You’ll notice that the “channel number” on the listener actor corresponds to the port number on the Stream-Setup dialog.

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Now you’re off to the races. Do something exciting, or not, but play with all of the buttons, sliders, and gizmos so you know how they all work. For extra credit, remember that you can also send messages back to your layout. To do this you need to use the OSC Transmit actor. You’ll also need to know the IP address of your device, and the port that you’re transmitting to – you can find all of this information on the same page in TouchOSC where you initially set your target IP address.

Quartz Composer

If you’re working with Apple’s Quartz Composer you have to do a little more work to get your OSC stream up and running. For starters, you’ll need to know a little bit more about your OSC messages. You’ll notice in the TouchOSC editor that each object has an address that’s associated with it. For example, my fader is ” /1/fader1 “. To Touch OSC this reads as Fader 1 on Page 1 of your layout. In order to read information from this slider in Quartz, we’ll need to know this address, along with the type of information that we’re sending. In the case of a slider we’re sending a float (a number with fractional parts). To get started let’s open up a new Quartz Composer patch, and add an “OSC Receiver” from the library.

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Now let’s take a closer look at that node. If we look at the inspector, and at the settings page we can see lots of useful information.

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Here we can see what port we’re set to receive information on by default, as well as an example of how we need to format the key’s from our layout so Quartz can properly receive the signals coming over the network. Let’s set up our fader to be properly decoded by Quartz. First we’ll need to remove the test key. Next we’ll want to add a new key by typing in the dialog box /1/fader1 and designating this as a float. Finally, click the plus sign to add this key the receiver. I usually add something else to my Quartz patch to make sure that I’m passing values through my network, this is optional.

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There you go. Now, to add the other buttons and sliders from your layout, you’ll need to similarly add keys for each of the buttons, sliders, and gizmos. Remember that you can find this information in your TouchOSC editor for this layout:

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Now you’re cooking with gas. Experiment with your layout, and how you can use this buttons and sliders to drive your Quartz Composer creations. For extra credit remember that you can also transmit back to your device. In this case you’ll need to use the “OSC Sender” object in Quartz. You’ll need to know the IP address of your target device, as well as the port that you’re communicating on. Have fun, and making something interesting… or if nothing else, learn something along the way.

TouchDesigner

If you’re working with Derivative’s TouchDesigner you have two options for receiving OSC information – CHOPs or DATS. Both of these methods work well but might have different uses for different situations.

Screenshot_032514_083023_PMLet’s start by looking at the OSC in CHOP. First we need to specify what port we want to listen to. Take a look at the TouchOSC layout to make sure the ports and addresses match. Then start moving sliders and buttons to see them appear in TouchDesigner.

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To use these to drive various parts of your network you can either use a select CHOP or reference these channels with expressions.

Next let’s look at what we see coming from the OSC In DAT.

Screenshot_032514_083545_PMHere instead of a changing single we see table with a message header and then with our float values coming in as static messages. Depending on the circumstance one or the other of these methods is going to help you drive your network.

For extra credit use the OSC out Chop to push values back to your TouchOSC layout – remember that you’ll need the IP address of your device, the port you’re receiving messages on, and you’ll need to format the header of the message correctly so that it corresponds to the right slider or button. Have fun learning and playing with your layout of all of the different kinds of controls.

2 thoughts on “TouchOSC | Serious Show Control

  1. Pingback: Inside Wonder Dome | TouchDesigner | Matthew Ragan

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