Escher Image and Animation Research

In thinking about what the media and animation for The Fall of the House of Escher might look like I’ve been sifting through the internet this summer looking for images that abstractly represent the universe and the behavior of particles and waves. Some of the more interesting work that I’ve found uses simple geometric shapes, and particle systems to evoke a sense of scale and distance and perspective. The work of the motion graphics designer Mr. Div is a prime example of someone who makes works that are both simple and also strikingly captivating.

The gif to the right is amy attempt at copying his piece “Tri-Heart”. I think copy-art is a practice that can’t be over stated. Recreating a work that you see from scratch teaches you more than simply following a tutorial. You are forced to wrestle with questions of how and why, and solve problems that don’t necessarily have clear solutions. While I don’t think this animation, specifically, is going to find it’s way into Escher, there are qualities of it that I really like and that feel distinctly quantum.

On the other end of the spectrum, in the “just follow along with a tutorial” category is a fascinating how-to create by minutephysics. Their quick After Effects tutorial covers how to create a simple simulation of formation of the universe. While it’s not scientifically accurate, the aesthetic conveys the look and feel of much more complex simulations that look at formation of the universe. Both of their videos are worth a watch, and the result of the tutorial can be seen here. Again, I don’t know that this exact animation will be something that I use, but it has elements that are inspiring and interesting.

In many respects there is a daunting amount of media in this production – interactive elements, large scale animations, moments of world-shifting perspective, and the expression of the abstract inner space of the atom. There’s a life-time of work in this production, and it goes up in October. There’s lots to do.